I needed a simple method for doing some timings in Silverlight. Silverlight lacks the high performance query counter that is available natively in Windows (and available in .NET 3.5 for example), but it does have a TickCount. My code (mostly) mirrors the existing .NET Stopwatch class using the TickCount property of the Environment class.

Just create an instance of the class and call Start to start the timer, and then get the value of one of the  ElapsedNNN properties to get a live reading without stopping the timer or the Stop function to stop the timer completely.

Update April 4, 2010:

Even though there were some doubters in the comments suggesting I didn’t test the original version that was here – I had … so I’m confused as to why it had worked for me, yet not in current versions of Silverlight. In any case, I’ve updated the code and have included a sample of how to use it. Thanks to those who provided suggested fixes.

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace WiredPrairie.Silverlight
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Stopwatch is used to measure the general performance of Silverlight functionality. Silverlight
    /// does not currently provide a high resolution timer as is available in many operating systems,
    /// so the resolution of this timer is limited to milliseconds. This class is best used to measure
    /// the relative performance of functions over many iterations.
    /// </summary>
    public sealed class Stopwatch
    {
        private long _startTick;
        private long _elapsed;
        private bool _isRunning;

        /// <summary>
        /// Creates a new instance of the class and starts the watch immediately.
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>An instance of Stopwatch, running.</returns>
        public static Stopwatch StartNew()
        {
            Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
            sw.Start();
            return sw;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Creates an instance of the Stopwatch class.
        /// </summary>
        public Stopwatch() { }

        /// <summary>
        /// Completely resets and deactivates the timer.
        /// </summary>
        public void Reset()
        {
            _elapsed = 0;
            _isRunning = false;
            _startTick = 0;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Begins the timer.
        /// </summary>
        public void Start()
        {
            if (!_isRunning)
            {
                _startTick = GetCurrentTicks();
                _isRunning = true;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Stops the current timer.
        /// </summary>
        public void Stop()
        {
            if (_isRunning)
            {
                _elapsed += GetCurrentTicks() - _startTick;
                _isRunning = false;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets a value indicating whether the instance is currently recording.
        /// </summary>
        public bool IsRunning
        {
            get { return _isRunning; }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets the Elapsed time as a Timespan.
        /// </summary>
        public TimeSpan Elapsed
        {
            get { return TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(ElapsedMilliseconds); }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets the Elapsed time as the total number of milliseconds.
        /// </summary>
        public long ElapsedMilliseconds
        {
            get { return GetCurrentElapsedTicks() / TimeSpan.TicksPerMillisecond; }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets the Elapsed time as the total number of ticks (which is faked
        /// as Silverlight doesn't have a way to get at the actual "Ticks")
        /// </summary>
        public long ElapsedTicks
        {
            get { return GetCurrentElapsedTicks(); }
        }

        private long GetCurrentElapsedTicks()
        {
            return (long) (this._elapsed + (IsRunning ? (GetCurrentTicks() - _startTick) : 0));
        }

        private long GetCurrentTicks()
        {
            // TickCount: Gets the number of milliseconds elapsed since the system started.
            return Environment.TickCount * TimeSpan.TicksPerMillisecond;
        }
    }
}


Sample usage:

Stopwatch sw1 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
Thread.Sleep(20);
sw1.Stop();
Debug.WriteLine("Slept for 5 milliseconds ... actually: {0}", sw1.ElapsedMilliseconds);

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